Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 1, 2008

There have been 16 news stories since your last update.

Academic

Elis awarded Goldwater Scholarships
Yale University April 01, 2008 The International Education and Fellowship Programs office announced Friday that three Yale students have been awarded the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship, considered one of the most prestigious scholarships given to undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, engineering and the natural sciences.
RWD Celebrates 20 Years of Innovation and Philanthropy
RWD Technologies April 01, 2008 Local Company Grows Global Business While Supporting Maryland Education
Announcements

Elis awarded Goldwater Scholarships
Yale University April 01, 2008 The International Education and Fellowship Programs office announced Friday that three Yale students have been awarded the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship, considered one of the most prestigious scholarships given to undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, engineering and the natural sciences.
RWD Celebrates 20 Years of Innovation and Philanthropy
RWD Technologies April 01, 2008 Local Company Grows Global Business While Supporting Maryland Education
mPhase/AlwaysReady Set to Make Battery History
mPhase/AlwaysReady, Inc. April 01, 2008 mPhase/AlwaysReady, Inc. (OTCBB: XDSL) stated today that it is set to make battery history on Thursday, April 3rd at 9:00am ET, by demonstrating for the first time a significant breakthrough in battery technology enabled by microfluidics -- the science that deals with the behavior, control and manipulation of fluids geometrically constrained to a small, typically sub-milimeter, scale. The event will be held at AJ Maxwells located at 57 W. 48th Street in New York City and will be hosted by mPhase/AlwaysReady, Inc. The mPhase/AlwaysReady Smart NanoBattery uses microfluidics to transfer liquid electrolyte through a nanostructured separator known as a membrane which makes contact with the solid electrodes, enabling activation of an electrical device. The membrane is designed to keep the electrolyte separate from the electrodes until activation is initiated.
Classification regime revealed
theaustralian.news.com.au April 01, 2008 CLOUD physics and private policing. String theory and nanomedicine. Ubiquitous computing. Consumption and everyday life. Understanding past societies not elsewhere classified. These are just a few, eye-catching research fields from the new regime for classifying the myriad objects of academic inquiry. The rationale for a new Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification, published yesterday by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, is to keep abreast of the twists and turns of science and intellectual fashion. The ANZSRC also will help define what disciplines are to be examined for quality under the new Excellence in Research initiative of the Federal Government, as Innovation, Industry, Science and Research Minister Kim Carr pointed out yesterday.
Futuristic Electronics and Better Diplomacy Among the Focuses of Pitt-Involved Research for U.S. Defense Department
University of Pittsburgh March 31, 2008 Pitt will receive nearly $2.7 million as part of collaborative research with universities around the country
Think green, UO's Hutchison says, to reduce nanotech hazards
University of Oregon March 31, 2008 In an invited paper in the international journal ACS Nano, UO prof points to greener nanoscience as a key to safety Approaches to Uncertainty in Nanomaterials "One of our greatest assets in nanoscience, the largely unexplored nanoscale world that we are trying to understand, is also perhaps the biggest hindrance to the application of nanomaterials to the macroscopic world. We need to understand the impact of these nanomaterials on us and on the world around us. Greater understanding of the key aspects of these materials and their roles, better characterization methods, and narrower variations will all make applications both easier and safer." Paul S. Weiss, Editor-in-Chief, and Penelope A. Lewis, Managing Editor of ACS Nano in an editorial that points to an article by the UO's Jim Hutchison
Manhattan Scientifics Signs Letter of Intent to Acquire Metallicum, Inc.
Manhattan Scientifics March 31, 2008 New Form of Metal Developed at the Los Alamos National Lab Holds Promise of Change for Dental Implants, Stents and Human Prosthetics
DRI Capital Inc. Acquires Royalties from Nanogen Inc. for US$10 Million
Nanogen, Inc. March 31, 2008 DRI Capital Inc. (DRI) and Nanogen, Inc. (Nasdaq:NGEN) announced today that they have entered into an agreement for DRI to acquire, for US$10 million, all future royalties generated by Applied Biosystems (ABI) under a license ABI has taken from Nanogen for MGB™ (minor groove binder) technology.
BioForce Nanosciences Reports Doubling of Quarterly and Annual Revenue, Gross Profit
BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. March 31, 2008 BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. (OTC BB: BFNH), a producer of integrated biological and mechanical systems for life science researchers at the micro and nano scales, today announced record revenue and gross profit for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2007.
SCHOTT and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC Form Joint Venture, DiamondView
SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) March 31, 2008 SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC (DDH), of Boothwyn, Pa., have formed a joint venture company, DiamondView(TM) Armor Products LLC (DAP), which will produce glass-ceramic armor materials and systems. DDH will be the 51% majority shareholder of the new company.
Trans-tasman biotech projects receive $3.8 million
New Zealand Government March 31, 2008 Hon Pete Hodgson Minister for Economic Development
Researchers use unique molecular signatures to visualize the body
technologyreview.com March 31, 2008 Although scientists understand much about diseases like cancer on a molecular level, imaging diseases still relies largely on anatomy--the outline and shape of a tumor or a clot, for instance. Researchers have been working on ways to visualize molecular changes that take place inside the body, and a new method may offer some advantages over existing anatomical and molecular imaging technologies. In a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, a team of researchers at Stanford University used Raman spectroscopy, a technique common in chemical analysis, paired with specialized nanoparticles to noninvasively visualize organs and tumors in living mice. The technique could be useful for studying complex disease processes in animals, and, if found to be safe in humans, it could help clinicians view multiple molecular changes in certain cancers and other diseases.
Sandia researchers purposely damage batteries to see how much abuse they can take
Sandia National Laboratories March 31, 2008 Efforts part of FreedomCAR program to get lithium-ion batteries into cars
New FT-IR Spectrometer Series from Varian, Inc.
Varian, Inc. March 31, 2008 Unrivalled Performance Meets Simplicity for Routine and Research Applications
Stanford researchers develop tool that 'sees' internal body details 1,000 times smaller
Stanford University Medical Center March 31, 2008 Doctors' quest to see what is happening inside a living body has been hampered by the limits on detecting tiny components of internal structures and events. Now a team of Stanford University School of Medicine researchers has developed a new type of imaging system that can illuminate tumors in living subjects-getting pictures with a precision of nearly one-trillionth of a meter.
Engineers Make First 'Active Matrix' Display Using Nanowires
Purdue University March 31, 2008 Engineers have created the first "active matrix" display using a new class of transparent transistors and circuits, a step toward realizing applications such as e-paper, flexible color monitors and "heads-up" displays in car windshields.
Automotive/Transportation

Sandia researchers purposely damage batteries to see how much abuse they can take
Sandia National Laboratories March 31, 2008 Efforts part of FreedomCAR program to get lithium-ion batteries into cars
Discoveries

Researchers use unique molecular signatures to visualize the body
technologyreview.com March 31, 2008 Although scientists understand much about diseases like cancer on a molecular level, imaging diseases still relies largely on anatomy--the outline and shape of a tumor or a clot, for instance. Researchers have been working on ways to visualize molecular changes that take place inside the body, and a new method may offer some advantages over existing anatomical and molecular imaging technologies. In a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, a team of researchers at Stanford University used Raman spectroscopy, a technique common in chemical analysis, paired with specialized nanoparticles to noninvasively visualize organs and tumors in living mice. The technique could be useful for studying complex disease processes in animals, and, if found to be safe in humans, it could help clinicians view multiple molecular changes in certain cancers and other diseases.
Sandia researchers purposely damage batteries to see how much abuse they can take
Sandia National Laboratories March 31, 2008 Efforts part of FreedomCAR program to get lithium-ion batteries into cars
Stanford researchers develop tool that 'sees' internal body details 1,000 times smaller
Stanford University Medical Center March 31, 2008 Doctors' quest to see what is happening inside a living body has been hampered by the limits on detecting tiny components of internal structures and events. Now a team of Stanford University School of Medicine researchers has developed a new type of imaging system that can illuminate tumors in living subjects-getting pictures with a precision of nearly one-trillionth of a meter.
Financial Reports

BioForce Nanosciences Reports Doubling of Quarterly and Annual Revenue, Gross Profit
BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. March 31, 2008 BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. (OTC BB: BFNH), a producer of integrated biological and mechanical systems for life science researchers at the micro and nano scales, today announced record revenue and gross profit for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2007.
Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Classification regime revealed
theaustralian.news.com.au April 01, 2008 CLOUD physics and private policing. String theory and nanomedicine. Ubiquitous computing. Consumption and everyday life. Understanding past societies not elsewhere classified. These are just a few, eye-catching research fields from the new regime for classifying the myriad objects of academic inquiry. The rationale for a new Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification, published yesterday by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, is to keep abreast of the twists and turns of science and intellectual fashion. The ANZSRC also will help define what disciplines are to be examined for quality under the new Excellence in Research initiative of the Federal Government, as Innovation, Industry, Science and Research Minister Kim Carr pointed out yesterday.
Futuristic Electronics and Better Diplomacy Among the Focuses of Pitt-Involved Research for U.S. Defense Department
University of Pittsburgh March 31, 2008 Pitt will receive nearly $2.7 million as part of collaborative research with universities around the country
Trans-tasman biotech projects receive $3.8 million
New Zealand Government March 31, 2008 Hon Pete Hodgson Minister for Economic Development
Materials

Manhattan Scientifics Signs Letter of Intent to Acquire Metallicum, Inc.
Manhattan Scientifics March 31, 2008 New Form of Metal Developed at the Los Alamos National Lab Holds Promise of Change for Dental Implants, Stents and Human Prosthetics
SCHOTT and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC Form Joint Venture, DiamondView
SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) March 31, 2008 SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC (DDH), of Boothwyn, Pa., have formed a joint venture company, DiamondView(TM) Armor Products LLC (DAP), which will produce glass-ceramic armor materials and systems. DDH will be the 51% majority shareholder of the new company.
Military

SCHOTT and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC Form Joint Venture, DiamondView
SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) March 31, 2008 SCHOTT North America (SCHOTT) and Dynamic Defense Holdings LLC (DDH), of Boothwyn, Pa., have formed a joint venture company, DiamondView(TM) Armor Products LLC (DAP), which will produce glass-ceramic armor materials and systems. DDH will be the 51% majority shareholder of the new company.
Nanoelectronics

Engineers Make First 'Active Matrix' Display Using Nanowires
Purdue University March 31, 2008 Engineers have created the first "active matrix" display using a new class of transparent transistors and circuits, a step toward realizing applications such as e-paper, flexible color monitors and "heads-up" displays in car windshields.
Nanomedicine

Manhattan Scientifics Signs Letter of Intent to Acquire Metallicum, Inc.
Manhattan Scientifics March 31, 2008 New Form of Metal Developed at the Los Alamos National Lab Holds Promise of Change for Dental Implants, Stents and Human Prosthetics
DRI Capital Inc. Acquires Royalties from Nanogen Inc. for US$10 Million
Nanogen, Inc. March 31, 2008 DRI Capital Inc. (DRI) and Nanogen, Inc. (Nasdaq:NGEN) announced today that they have entered into an agreement for DRI to acquire, for US$10 million, all future royalties generated by Applied Biosystems (ABI) under a license ABI has taken from Nanogen for MGB™ (minor groove binder) technology.
BioForce Nanosciences Reports Doubling of Quarterly and Annual Revenue, Gross Profit
BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. March 31, 2008 BioForce Nanosciences Holdings, Inc. (OTC BB: BFNH), a producer of integrated biological and mechanical systems for life science researchers at the micro and nano scales, today announced record revenue and gross profit for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2007.
Researchers use unique molecular signatures to visualize the body
technologyreview.com March 31, 2008 Although scientists understand much about diseases like cancer on a molecular level, imaging diseases still relies largely on anatomy--the outline and shape of a tumor or a clot, for instance. Researchers have been working on ways to visualize molecular changes that take place inside the body, and a new method may offer some advantages over existing anatomical and molecular imaging technologies. In a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, a team of researchers at Stanford University used Raman spectroscopy, a technique common in chemical analysis, paired with specialized nanoparticles to noninvasively visualize organs and tumors in living mice. The technique could be useful for studying complex disease processes in animals, and, if found to be safe in humans, it could help clinicians view multiple molecular changes in certain cancers and other diseases.
Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Think green, UO's Hutchison says, to reduce nanotech hazards
University of Oregon March 31, 2008 In an invited paper in the international journal ACS Nano, UO prof points to greener nanoscience as a key to safety Approaches to Uncertainty in Nanomaterials "One of our greatest assets in nanoscience, the largely unexplored nanoscale world that we are trying to understand, is also perhaps the biggest hindrance to the application of nanomaterials to the macroscopic world. We need to understand the impact of these nanomaterials on us and on the world around us. Greater understanding of the key aspects of these materials and their roles, better characterization methods, and narrower variations will all make applications both easier and safer." Paul S. Weiss, Editor-in-Chief, and Penelope A. Lewis, Managing Editor of ACS Nano in an editorial that points to an article by the UO's Jim Hutchison
DRI Capital Inc. Acquires Royalties from Nanogen Inc. for US$10 Million
Nanogen, Inc. March 31, 2008 DRI Capital Inc. (DRI) and Nanogen, Inc. (Nasdaq:NGEN) announced today that they have entered into an agreement for DRI to acquire, for US$10 million, all future royalties generated by Applied Biosystems (ABI) under a license ABI has taken from Nanogen for MGB™ (minor groove binder) technology.
Quantum Computing

Futuristic Electronics and Better Diplomacy Among the Focuses of Pitt-Involved Research for U.S. Defense Department
University of Pittsburgh March 31, 2008 Pitt will receive nearly $2.7 million as part of collaborative research with universities around the country
Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Think green, UO's Hutchison says, to reduce nanotech hazards
University of Oregon March 31, 2008 In an invited paper in the international journal ACS Nano, UO prof points to greener nanoscience as a key to safety Approaches to Uncertainty in Nanomaterials "One of our greatest assets in nanoscience, the largely unexplored nanoscale world that we are trying to understand, is also perhaps the biggest hindrance to the application of nanomaterials to the macroscopic world. We need to understand the impact of these nanomaterials on us and on the world around us. Greater understanding of the key aspects of these materials and their roles, better characterization methods, and narrower variations will all make applications both easier and safer." Paul S. Weiss, Editor-in-Chief, and Penelope A. Lewis, Managing Editor of ACS Nano in an editorial that points to an article by the UO's Jim Hutchison
Spintronics

Futuristic Electronics and Better Diplomacy Among the Focuses of Pitt-Involved Research for U.S. Defense Department
University of Pittsburgh March 31, 2008 Pitt will receive nearly $2.7 million as part of collaborative research with universities around the country
Tools

Trans-tasman biotech projects receive $3.8 million
New Zealand Government March 31, 2008 Hon Pete Hodgson Minister for Economic Development
Researchers use unique molecular signatures to visualize the body
technologyreview.com March 31, 2008 Although scientists understand much about diseases like cancer on a molecular level, imaging diseases still relies largely on anatomy--the outline and shape of a tumor or a clot, for instance. Researchers have been working on ways to visualize molecular changes that take place inside the body, and a new method may offer some advantages over existing anatomical and molecular imaging technologies. In a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, a team of researchers at Stanford University used Raman spectroscopy, a technique common in chemical analysis, paired with specialized nanoparticles to noninvasively visualize organs and tumors in living mice. The technique could be useful for studying complex disease processes in animals, and, if found to be safe in humans, it could help clinicians view multiple molecular changes in certain cancers and other diseases.
New FT-IR Spectrometer Series from Varian, Inc.
Varian, Inc. March 31, 2008 Unrivalled Performance Meets Simplicity for Routine and Research Applications
Stanford researchers develop tool that 'sees' internal body details 1,000 times smaller
Stanford University Medical Center March 31, 2008 Doctors' quest to see what is happening inside a living body has been hampered by the limits on detecting tiny components of internal structures and events. Now a team of Stanford University School of Medicine researchers has developed a new type of imaging system that can illuminate tumors in living subjects-getting pictures with a precision of nearly one-trillionth of a meter.
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