Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 11, 2008

There have been 13 news stories since your last update.

Academic/Education

UAlbany NanoCollege Features Clean Energy and Environmental Technologies at NanoCareer Day
UAlbany CNSE April 10, 2008 More than 300 middle- and high-school students see how nanotechnology is enabling 'New Energy, Clean Environment, Bright Future'
Announcements

Agilent Technologies Expands miRNA Microarray Catalog with New Human, Mouse and Rat Assays
Agilent Technologies Inc. April 11, 2008 Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE:A) today introduced three new microRNA microarray designs: Human miRNA Microarray v2.0, Mouse miRNA Microarray v1.0 and Rat miRNA Microarray v1.0. All are based on the Sanger Institute's miRBase 10.1, updated in December 2007.
UAlbany NanoCollege Features Clean Energy and Environmental Technologies at NanoCareer Day
UAlbany CNSE April 10, 2008 More than 300 middle- and high-school students see how nanotechnology is enabling 'New Energy, Clean Environment, Bright Future'
Science-Metrix launches the Nanotechnology World R&D Report 2008
Science-Metrix April 10, 2008 Science-Metrix, the science and technology measurement and evaluation firm that created R&D Reports(TM), today announced the launch of the Nanotechnology World R&D Report 2008. This off-the-shelf report, based on Scopus(R) and USPTO data, enables its users to rapidly determine where and by whom cutting-edge R&D on the nanoscale is being conducted.
Clariant Annual General Meeting Confirms Company's Course
Clariant April 10, 2008 All motions proposed by the Board of Directors adopted by a large majority
New chemical sensors can detect TNT vapour from the roadside.
scenta.co.uk April 10, 2008 Chemical sensors developed at the University of Michigan positioned along the roadside or at other military locations could sniff out TNT and give off signals that could alert military personnel to the location of a bomb. These sensors could be made for as cheaply as US$10 each, according to the team leader, chemistry professor Theodore Goodson III, and would be monitored by passing military vehicles equipped with infra-red lasers. Personnel could fire these lasers at the sensors to excite the fluorescence and a specially-designed light-collection system would detect the sensors' response. Any sensors that don't fluoresce would be tip-offs to possible locations of roadside bombs. Goodson's innovation uses highly sensitive, low-cost, battery-free, thin film sensors which require no electronic equipment or excitation source at the sites where they are installed. Current chemical TNT sensors must be used in close proximity to the suspicious site, increasing the risk for military personnel.
Micronit Microfluidics Receives € 1.2M Grant
lab-on-a-chip.com April 10, 2008 Micronit Microfluidics has been granted € 1.2M within High Tech Factory. Minister of Economic Affairs Ms. Maria van der Hoeven announced this on April 2nd. High Tech Factory is a joint initiative of microsystems and nanotechnology companies around MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente. Micronit, founded in 1999 as a spin-off from the University of Twente, develops and manufactures lab-on-a-chip devices of glass. The grant will fund the further development of a high-quality production line for the manufacture of microfluidic chips. Micha Mulder, CEO of Micronit, explains: "To meet the growing demands of our customers and of the general microfluidics market, we need to expand our production facilities. The grant enables us to improve our process development and to increase the manufacture of microfluidic products."
Researcher looks to use nanoparticles for food safety
physorg.com April 10, 2008 Byron Brehm-Stecher, assistant professor in food science and human nutrition, has some big ideas for his work with tiny particles. His latest research project will allow him to study the potential of using silver nanoparticles to improve the safety of the world's food supply. Although the particles can't be added directly to foods, the ultimate goal of this project is to develop food-related applications such as microbe-resistant fabrics or non-biofouling surfaces. The research, he said, could have a large impact on the safety of foods. "Through our work, we hope to gain a greater understanding of how these materials affect microbial structure or function," Brehm-Stecher said. "This may lead to new approaches for killing foodborne pathogens and enhancing food safety. For example, silver nanoparticles are already being used in food packaging to soak up the plant-ripening hormone ethylene, extending the shelf life of fruits. The science is at a basic point right now, but we expect that it will translate into something more applied in the future. I'm looking forward to extending this as far as the questions we have will take us."
IBM Moves Closer to New Class of Memory: spintronics, racetrack memory, Stuart Parkin, MRAM, computer memory, hard disk
IBM April 10, 2008 Computer memory that combines the high performance and reliability of flash with the low cost and high capacity of the hard disk drive could be closer than you think, thanks to a team of IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists.
Popcorn-ball design doubles efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells
University of Washington April 10, 2008 A new approach is able to create a dramatic improvement in cheap solar cells now being developed in laboratories. By using a popcorn-ball design -- tiny kernels clumped into much larger porous spheres -- researchers at the University of Washington are able to manipulate light and more than double the efficiency of converting solar energy to electricity. The findings will be presented today in New Orleans at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.
Acquisition of Technologies and Devices International, Inc.
Oxford Instruments plc April 10, 2008 Oxford Instruments plc ("Oxford Instruments" or "the Group"), the high technology tools and systems company, today announces the acquisition of Technologies and Devices International, Inc. ("TDI" or "the Company"), a US based company which is a world leader in the development of Hydride Vapour Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) technology and processes. Using this technology, Oxford Instruments intends to produce tools that enable suppliers of High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes (HBLEDs) to cut manufacturing times by 25%, allowing a reduction in the production costs of these environmentally friendly devices.
Norway to award nanotech 'Nobel prize'
euractiv.com April 10, 2008 The winner, or winners, of the first ever science prize for outstanding achievement in nanosciences will be announced next month by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The first winners of the new Kavli Prizeexternal , comprising three international awards for outstanding contributions in the fields of nanoscience, neuroscience and astrophysics, will be announced on 28 May 2008. The prizes, to be awarded every two years, will be presented in co-operation with the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters and the Norwegian ministries for education and research and foreign affairs. They are worth $1 million each, which makes them comparable to the cash received by Nobel Prize winners. According to Professor Reidun Sirev├ąg, the Academy's secretary general, the prize is the first of its kind for nanoscience. "It will be very interesting to know the winner, as the nanoscience field is not yet that specific," she said.
Chip Technology

IBM Moves Closer to New Class of Memory: spintronics, racetrack memory, Stuart Parkin, MRAM, computer memory, hard disk
IBM April 10, 2008 Computer memory that combines the high performance and reliability of flash with the low cost and high capacity of the hard disk drive could be closer than you think, thanks to a team of IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists.
Can the Atom help Intel's CEO meet otherworldly demands?
theregister.co.uk April 10, 2008 Interview Exclusive Strolling towards Intel's headquarters, I hoped my meeting with Paul Otellini would not be as awkward as the last encounter with an acting Intel CEO. Jumping past Intel's near-term agenda and well into the future, I wondered how the company might apply its nanotechnology expertise to areas outside of the traditional semiconductor field. Companies such as Applied Materials have re-tooled semiconductor manufacturing equipment to pump out silicon-based solar cells, and a number of start-ups have issued specialized processors that can crank through tasks such as protein folding at remarkable speeds. Perhaps Intel would like to have a go at something along these lines. "We have looked at both of those markets," Otellini said. "There is no commonality between our factories and the factories that you would need to run to build solar cells. The equipment is different, the factory flow is different, the clean-room levels are much less necessary. And, for solar factories, you need these big, long almost football field kinds of buildings with a linear process control. So, there is not a lot of re-use of, say, our old factories or old equipment. "So, you would have to enter it as a standalone business, and that doesn't seem to be attractive to us right now in terms of where our capital can be used. "It's a similar story on stuff like the Affymetrics products. As we investigated the various aspects around digital health, we looked at those kinds of things. We're really good at digital logic, and I think that is where we want to keep our focus."
Discoveries

New chemical sensors can detect TNT vapour from the roadside.
scenta.co.uk April 10, 2008 Chemical sensors developed at the University of Michigan positioned along the roadside or at other military locations could sniff out TNT and give off signals that could alert military personnel to the location of a bomb. These sensors could be made for as cheaply as US$10 each, according to the team leader, chemistry professor Theodore Goodson III, and would be monitored by passing military vehicles equipped with infra-red lasers. Personnel could fire these lasers at the sensors to excite the fluorescence and a specially-designed light-collection system would detect the sensors' response. Any sensors that don't fluoresce would be tip-offs to possible locations of roadside bombs. Goodson's innovation uses highly sensitive, low-cost, battery-free, thin film sensors which require no electronic equipment or excitation source at the sites where they are installed. Current chemical TNT sensors must be used in close proximity to the suspicious site, increasing the risk for military personnel.
Researcher looks to use nanoparticles for food safety
physorg.com April 10, 2008 Byron Brehm-Stecher, assistant professor in food science and human nutrition, has some big ideas for his work with tiny particles. His latest research project will allow him to study the potential of using silver nanoparticles to improve the safety of the world's food supply. Although the particles can't be added directly to foods, the ultimate goal of this project is to develop food-related applications such as microbe-resistant fabrics or non-biofouling surfaces. The research, he said, could have a large impact on the safety of foods. "Through our work, we hope to gain a greater understanding of how these materials affect microbial structure or function," Brehm-Stecher said. "This may lead to new approaches for killing foodborne pathogens and enhancing food safety. For example, silver nanoparticles are already being used in food packaging to soak up the plant-ripening hormone ethylene, extending the shelf life of fruits. The science is at a basic point right now, but we expect that it will translate into something more applied in the future. I'm looking forward to extending this as far as the questions we have will take us."
Popcorn-ball design doubles efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells
University of Washington April 10, 2008 A new approach is able to create a dramatic improvement in cheap solar cells now being developed in laboratories. By using a popcorn-ball design -- tiny kernels clumped into much larger porous spheres -- researchers at the University of Washington are able to manipulate light and more than double the efficiency of converting solar energy to electricity. The findings will be presented today in New Orleans at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.
Energy

UAlbany NanoCollege Features Clean Energy and Environmental Technologies at NanoCareer Day
UAlbany CNSE April 10, 2008 More than 300 middle- and high-school students see how nanotechnology is enabling 'New Energy, Clean Environment, Bright Future'
Popcorn-ball design doubles efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells
University of Washington April 10, 2008 A new approach is able to create a dramatic improvement in cheap solar cells now being developed in laboratories. By using a popcorn-ball design -- tiny kernels clumped into much larger porous spheres -- researchers at the University of Washington are able to manipulate light and more than double the efficiency of converting solar energy to electricity. The findings will be presented today in New Orleans at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.
Environment

UAlbany NanoCollege Features Clean Energy and Environmental Technologies at NanoCareer Day
UAlbany CNSE April 10, 2008 More than 300 middle- and high-school students see how nanotechnology is enabling 'New Energy, Clean Environment, Bright Future'
Food/Agriculture/Supplements

Researcher looks to use nanoparticles for food safety
physorg.com April 10, 2008 Byron Brehm-Stecher, assistant professor in food science and human nutrition, has some big ideas for his work with tiny particles. His latest research project will allow him to study the potential of using silver nanoparticles to improve the safety of the world's food supply. Although the particles can't be added directly to foods, the ultimate goal of this project is to develop food-related applications such as microbe-resistant fabrics or non-biofouling surfaces. The research, he said, could have a large impact on the safety of foods. "Through our work, we hope to gain a greater understanding of how these materials affect microbial structure or function," Brehm-Stecher said. "This may lead to new approaches for killing foodborne pathogens and enhancing food safety. For example, silver nanoparticles are already being used in food packaging to soak up the plant-ripening hormone ethylene, extending the shelf life of fruits. The science is at a basic point right now, but we expect that it will translate into something more applied in the future. I'm looking forward to extending this as far as the questions we have will take us."
Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Micronit Microfluidics Receives € 1.2M Grant
lab-on-a-chip.com April 10, 2008 Micronit Microfluidics has been granted € 1.2M within High Tech Factory. Minister of Economic Affairs Ms. Maria van der Hoeven announced this on April 2nd. High Tech Factory is a joint initiative of microsystems and nanotechnology companies around MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente. Micronit, founded in 1999 as a spin-off from the University of Twente, develops and manufactures lab-on-a-chip devices of glass. The grant will fund the further development of a high-quality production line for the manufacture of microfluidic chips. Micha Mulder, CEO of Micronit, explains: "To meet the growing demands of our customers and of the general microfluidics market, we need to expand our production facilities. The grant enables us to improve our process development and to increase the manufacture of microfluidic products."
Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports

Novel delivery systems solve formulation challenges
cosmeticsdesign-europe.com April 11, 2008 Liposomes and nanoemulsions are believed to have a great future in the cosmetic delivery systems, according to the authors, who also cite cosmetic patches as having great potential for the future. Liposomes are used to encapsulate ingredients and facilitate their transfer across the skin barrier thereby solving some of the stability challenges experienced when using certain actives. Furthermore, multiple ingredients can be encapsulated and included in the same formulation without danger of reactions between the ingredients. New encapsulation technologies will also play a role in one of the most important future delivery trends, namely the controlled release of actives.
Science-Metrix launches the Nanotechnology World R&D Report 2008
Science-Metrix April 10, 2008 Science-Metrix, the science and technology measurement and evaluation firm that created R&D Reports(TM), today announced the launch of the Nanotechnology World R&D Report 2008. This off-the-shelf report, based on Scopus(R) and USPTO data, enables its users to rapidly determine where and by whom cutting-edge R&D on the nanoscale is being conducted.
Can the Atom help Intel's CEO meet otherworldly demands?
theregister.co.uk April 10, 2008 Interview Exclusive Strolling towards Intel's headquarters, I hoped my meeting with Paul Otellini would not be as awkward as the last encounter with an acting Intel CEO. Jumping past Intel's near-term agenda and well into the future, I wondered how the company might apply its nanotechnology expertise to areas outside of the traditional semiconductor field. Companies such as Applied Materials have re-tooled semiconductor manufacturing equipment to pump out silicon-based solar cells, and a number of start-ups have issued specialized processors that can crank through tasks such as protein folding at remarkable speeds. Perhaps Intel would like to have a go at something along these lines. "We have looked at both of those markets," Otellini said. "There is no commonality between our factories and the factories that you would need to run to build solar cells. The equipment is different, the factory flow is different, the clean-room levels are much less necessary. And, for solar factories, you need these big, long almost football field kinds of buildings with a linear process control. So, there is not a lot of re-use of, say, our old factories or old equipment. "So, you would have to enter it as a standalone business, and that doesn't seem to be attractive to us right now in terms of where our capital can be used. "It's a similar story on stuff like the Affymetrics products. As we investigated the various aspects around digital health, we looked at those kinds of things. We're really good at digital logic, and I think that is where we want to keep our focus."
Jobs

UAlbany NanoCollege Features Clean Energy and Environmental Technologies at NanoCareer Day
UAlbany CNSE April 10, 2008 More than 300 middle- and high-school students see how nanotechnology is enabling 'New Energy, Clean Environment, Bright Future'
Memory Technology

IBM Moves Closer to New Class of Memory: spintronics, racetrack memory, Stuart Parkin, MRAM, computer memory, hard disk
IBM April 10, 2008 Computer memory that combines the high performance and reliability of flash with the low cost and high capacity of the hard disk drive could be closer than you think, thanks to a team of IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists.
Military

New chemical sensors can detect TNT vapour from the roadside.
scenta.co.uk April 10, 2008 Chemical sensors developed at the University of Michigan positioned along the roadside or at other military locations could sniff out TNT and give off signals that could alert military personnel to the location of a bomb. These sensors could be made for as cheaply as US$10 each, according to the team leader, chemistry professor Theodore Goodson III, and would be monitored by passing military vehicles equipped with infra-red lasers. Personnel could fire these lasers at the sensors to excite the fluorescence and a specially-designed light-collection system would detect the sensors' response. Any sensors that don't fluoresce would be tip-offs to possible locations of roadside bombs. Goodson's innovation uses highly sensitive, low-cost, battery-free, thin film sensors which require no electronic equipment or excitation source at the sites where they are installed. Current chemical TNT sensors must be used in close proximity to the suspicious site, increasing the risk for military personnel.
Nanomedicine

Agilent Technologies Expands miRNA Microarray Catalog with New Human, Mouse and Rat Assays
Agilent Technologies Inc. April 11, 2008 Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE:A) today introduced three new microRNA microarray designs: Human miRNA Microarray v2.0, Mouse miRNA Microarray v1.0 and Rat miRNA Microarray v1.0. All are based on the Sanger Institute's miRBase 10.1, updated in December 2007.
Personal Care

Novel delivery systems solve formulation challenges
cosmeticsdesign-europe.com April 11, 2008 Liposomes and nanoemulsions are believed to have a great future in the cosmetic delivery systems, according to the authors, who also cite cosmetic patches as having great potential for the future. Liposomes are used to encapsulate ingredients and facilitate their transfer across the skin barrier thereby solving some of the stability challenges experienced when using certain actives. Furthermore, multiple ingredients can be encapsulated and included in the same formulation without danger of reactions between the ingredients. New encapsulation technologies will also play a role in one of the most important future delivery trends, namely the controlled release of actives.
Possible Futures

Novel delivery systems solve formulation challenges
cosmeticsdesign-europe.com April 11, 2008 Liposomes and nanoemulsions are believed to have a great future in the cosmetic delivery systems, according to the authors, who also cite cosmetic patches as having great potential for the future. Liposomes are used to encapsulate ingredients and facilitate their transfer across the skin barrier thereby solving some of the stability challenges experienced when using certain actives. Furthermore, multiple ingredients can be encapsulated and included in the same formulation without danger of reactions between the ingredients. New encapsulation technologies will also play a role in one of the most important future delivery trends, namely the controlled release of actives.
IBM Moves Closer to New Class of Memory: spintronics, racetrack memory, Stuart Parkin, MRAM, computer memory, hard disk
IBM April 10, 2008 Computer memory that combines the high performance and reliability of flash with the low cost and high capacity of the hard disk drive could be closer than you think, thanks to a team of IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists.
Can the Atom help Intel's CEO meet otherworldly demands?
theregister.co.uk April 10, 2008 Interview Exclusive Strolling towards Intel's headquarters, I hoped my meeting with Paul Otellini would not be as awkward as the last encounter with an acting Intel CEO. Jumping past Intel's near-term agenda and well into the future, I wondered how the company might apply its nanotechnology expertise to areas outside of the traditional semiconductor field. Companies such as Applied Materials have re-tooled semiconductor manufacturing equipment to pump out silicon-based solar cells, and a number of start-ups have issued specialized processors that can crank through tasks such as protein folding at remarkable speeds. Perhaps Intel would like to have a go at something along these lines. "We have looked at both of those markets," Otellini said. "There is no commonality between our factories and the factories that you would need to run to build solar cells. The equipment is different, the factory flow is different, the clean-room levels are much less necessary. And, for solar factories, you need these big, long almost football field kinds of buildings with a linear process control. So, there is not a lot of re-use of, say, our old factories or old equipment. "So, you would have to enter it as a standalone business, and that doesn't seem to be attractive to us right now in terms of where our capital can be used. "It's a similar story on stuff like the Affymetrics products. As we investigated the various aspects around digital health, we looked at those kinds of things. We're really good at digital logic, and I think that is where we want to keep our focus."
Sensors

New chemical sensors can detect TNT vapour from the roadside.
scenta.co.uk April 10, 2008 Chemical sensors developed at the University of Michigan positioned along the roadside or at other military locations could sniff out TNT and give off signals that could alert military personnel to the location of a bomb. These sensors could be made for as cheaply as US$10 each, according to the team leader, chemistry professor Theodore Goodson III, and would be monitored by passing military vehicles equipped with infra-red lasers. Personnel could fire these lasers at the sensors to excite the fluorescence and a specially-designed light-collection system would detect the sensors' response. Any sensors that don't fluoresce would be tip-offs to possible locations of roadside bombs. Goodson's innovation uses highly sensitive, low-cost, battery-free, thin film sensors which require no electronic equipment or excitation source at the sites where they are installed. Current chemical TNT sensors must be used in close proximity to the suspicious site, increasing the risk for military personnel.
Textiles/Clothing

Researcher looks to use nanoparticles for food safety
physorg.com April 10, 2008 Byron Brehm-Stecher, assistant professor in food science and human nutrition, has some big ideas for his work with tiny particles. His latest research project will allow him to study the potential of using silver nanoparticles to improve the safety of the world's food supply. Although the particles can't be added directly to foods, the ultimate goal of this project is to develop food-related applications such as microbe-resistant fabrics or non-biofouling surfaces. The research, he said, could have a large impact on the safety of foods. "Through our work, we hope to gain a greater understanding of how these materials affect microbial structure or function," Brehm-Stecher said. "This may lead to new approaches for killing foodborne pathogens and enhancing food safety. For example, silver nanoparticles are already being used in food packaging to soak up the plant-ripening hormone ethylene, extending the shelf life of fruits. The science is at a basic point right now, but we expect that it will translate into something more applied in the future. I'm looking forward to extending this as far as the questions we have will take us."
Tools

Agilent Technologies Expands miRNA Microarray Catalog with New Human, Mouse and Rat Assays
Agilent Technologies Inc. April 11, 2008 Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE:A) today introduced three new microRNA microarray designs: Human miRNA Microarray v2.0, Mouse miRNA Microarray v1.0 and Rat miRNA Microarray v1.0. All are based on the Sanger Institute's miRBase 10.1, updated in December 2007.
Acquisition of Technologies and Devices International, Inc.
Oxford Instruments plc April 10, 2008 Oxford Instruments plc ("Oxford Instruments" or "the Group"), the high technology tools and systems company, today announces the acquisition of Technologies and Devices International, Inc. ("TDI" or "the Company"), a US based company which is a world leader in the development of Hydride Vapour Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) technology and processes. Using this technology, Oxford Instruments intends to produce tools that enable suppliers of High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes (HBLEDs) to cut manufacturing times by 25%, allowing a reduction in the production costs of these environmentally friendly devices.

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