Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 14, 2008

There have been 70 news stories since your last update.

Academic/Education

Nano Technology Buzzing at Georgia Tech
13wmaz.com April 14, 2008 The University of Michigan has opened its expanded nanotechnology lab, a $40 million project dedicated to inventing ultra-small tools for reshaping the worlds of medicine, computing and energy. The Ann Arbor lab doubles the research capacity at one of the 13 inter-linked, federally funded sites dedicated to nanotechnology, including Georgia Tech. Center Director Kensall Wise told The Associated Press in an interview at the lab Thursday, "Microsystems are going to be pervasive." Harvard, Stanford, Cornell, Penn State and Howard universities are part of the network, which also includes the universities of Texas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Washington and California-Santa Barbara; Georgia Institute of Technology; and a joint project of North Carolina State University and University of North Carolina.
UCLA’s Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) Reaches out to Young Minds to Replenish the Engineering Workforce
UCLA April 13, 2008 The Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) was created in 2003, after the National Science Foundation awarded the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science a grant worth nearly $18 million over five years to establish a new Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) that would focus on developing cost-effective nanomanufacturing technologies by working closely with industry.
Announcements

Kavli Prizes to honor top scientists
sfgate.com April 14, 2008 Someday, the surname of Fred Kavli, a Norwegian-born physicist and entrepreneur now living in Santa Barbara, might be as famous as that of Alfred Nobel - at least among scientists. The first winners of the three new Kavli Prizes for outstanding research in nanoscience, neuroscience and astrophysics will be announced May 28. In September, the winners each will receive $1 million, from the hand of Norwegian Crown Prince Haakon, at a ceremony in Oslo. The award is in the range of the Nobel Prize, which last year was approximately $1.6 million. "The three fields, astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience, were selected by Mr. Kavli himself. He thinks these are three of the most exciting fields of science this century, leading to the most important advances," said David Auston, president of the Kavli Foundation.
Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union
Industrial Nanotech, Inc. April 14, 2008 Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union Industrial Nanotech, Inc. (Pink Sheets:INTK), an emerging global leader in nanotechnology, announced today that the Company's patented Nansulate energy saving protective coatings are now approved under the stringent EU building codes. The approval certification for building construction standards in the European Union was obtained by the Company's distributor for Italy and Spain, Aktarus Group, based in Milan, Italy.
Five firms battling it out for Genesis award
sbpost.ie April 13, 2008 Glantreo is focused on the emerging area of nanotechnology and already holds a number of patents in the area of nano-particle synthesis. It believes its technology will have particular application in the water filtration and chemical separations market. For the first time this year, a special award will be presented to an alumnus of the programme, Kieran Moynihan, one of the founders of Comnitel Technologies. After completing the Genesis programme, the Cork company went on to merge with two US firms to become Vallent, which employed 120 people in Ireland. The company was sold to IBM last year in a deal believed to be worth $200 million.
UCLA’s Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) Reaches out to Young Minds to Replenish the Engineering Workforce
UCLA April 13, 2008 The Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) was created in 2003, after the National Science Foundation awarded the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science a grant worth nearly $18 million over five years to establish a new Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) that would focus on developing cost-effective nanomanufacturing technologies by working closely with industry.
Invisible electronics
idtechex.com April 13, 2008 Light emitting plastic was first discovered in Europe, at Cambridge University in the UK, and the Dye Sensitised Solar Cell was invented in Switzerland and is now in production - printed reel to reel - in the UK. Nanosolar described how it will soon be printing an alternative, the Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide DSSC photovoltaics reel to reel in Berlin, another world first. Markets inaccessible to silicon chips will be accessed by transistors printed reel to reel, PolyIC of Germany being in the lead, and photovoltaics cleverer than silicon solar cells (for instance transparent, tightly rollable and working from heat as well as light) have arrived.
OKI Printing Solutions Advancement on ''More Than Moore'' at International Nanotechnology Conference (INC4)
OKI Printing Solutions April 13, 2008 OKI Printing Solutions and its LED business company, OKI Digital Imaging, today announced their participation in the 4th International Nanotechnology Conference on Communication and Cooperation, to be held 14th-17th April in Tokyo, Japan.
Chip Technology

Invisible electronics
idtechex.com April 13, 2008 Light emitting plastic was first discovered in Europe, at Cambridge University in the UK, and the Dye Sensitised Solar Cell was invented in Switzerland and is now in production - printed reel to reel - in the UK. Nanosolar described how it will soon be printing an alternative, the Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide DSSC photovoltaics reel to reel in Berlin, another world first. Markets inaccessible to silicon chips will be accessed by transistors printed reel to reel, PolyIC of Germany being in the lead, and photovoltaics cleverer than silicon solar cells (for instance transparent, tightly rollable and working from heat as well as light) have arrived.
Energy

Invisible electronics
idtechex.com April 13, 2008 Light emitting plastic was first discovered in Europe, at Cambridge University in the UK, and the Dye Sensitised Solar Cell was invented in Switzerland and is now in production - printed reel to reel - in the UK. Nanosolar described how it will soon be printing an alternative, the Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide DSSC photovoltaics reel to reel in Berlin, another world first. Markets inaccessible to silicon chips will be accessed by transistors printed reel to reel, PolyIC of Germany being in the lead, and photovoltaics cleverer than silicon solar cells (for instance transparent, tightly rollable and working from heat as well as light) have arrived.
Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union
Industrial Nanotech, Inc. April 14, 2008 Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union Industrial Nanotech, Inc. (Pink Sheets:INTK), an emerging global leader in nanotechnology, announced today that the Company's patented Nansulate energy saving protective coatings are now approved under the stringent EU building codes. The approval certification for building construction standards in the European Union was obtained by the Company's distributor for Italy and Spain, Aktarus Group, based in Milan, Italy.
UCLA’s Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) Reaches out to Young Minds to Replenish the Engineering Workforce
UCLA April 13, 2008 The Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) was created in 2003, after the National Science Foundation awarded the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science a grant worth nearly $18 million over five years to establish a new Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) that would focus on developing cost-effective nanomanufacturing technologies by working closely with industry.
Human Interest/Art

UCLA’s Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) Reaches out to Young Minds to Replenish the Engineering Workforce
UCLA April 13, 2008 The Center for Scalable and Integrated Nanomanufacturing (SINAM) was created in 2003, after the National Science Foundation awarded the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science a grant worth nearly $18 million over five years to establish a new Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) that would focus on developing cost-effective nanomanufacturing technologies by working closely with industry.
Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports

Science has seen the future. And it is invisible
thestar.com April 14, 2008 "They were able to achieve invisibility to red and green light. Single colours of light can be bent in a way consistent with invisibility on a microscopic scale using nanotechnology," Kaku says. This has huge potential on the battlefield. Imagine a tank being invisible to enemy forces. No wonder the Pentagon is bankrolling research in this field. "The next step is to do a large object at one light colour," Kaku says. "Within 10 years, we may be able to make an object completely invisible to one colour of light." And that is only one of the seemingly outrageous accomplishments in the works that Kaku discusses in his new book, Physics of the Impossible.
Nano Technology Buzzing at Georgia Tech
13wmaz.com April 14, 2008 The University of Michigan has opened its expanded nanotechnology lab, a $40 million project dedicated to inventing ultra-small tools for reshaping the worlds of medicine, computing and energy. The Ann Arbor lab doubles the research capacity at one of the 13 inter-linked, federally funded sites dedicated to nanotechnology, including Georgia Tech. Center Director Kensall Wise told The Associated Press in an interview at the lab Thursday, "Microsystems are going to be pervasive." Harvard, Stanford, Cornell, Penn State and Howard universities are part of the network, which also includes the universities of Texas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Washington and California-Santa Barbara; Georgia Institute of Technology; and a joint project of North Carolina State University and University of North Carolina.
Materials

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union
Industrial Nanotech, Inc. April 14, 2008 Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Energy Saving Coating Receives Official Building Code Approvals For the European Union Industrial Nanotech, Inc. (Pink Sheets:INTK), an emerging global leader in nanotechnology, announced today that the Company's patented Nansulate energy saving protective coatings are now approved under the stringent EU building codes. The approval certification for building construction standards in the European Union was obtained by the Company's distributor for Italy and Spain, Aktarus Group, based in Milan, Italy.
MEMS

OKI Printing Solutions Advancement on ''More Than Moore'' at International Nanotechnology Conference (INC4)
OKI Printing Solutions April 13, 2008 OKI Printing Solutions and its LED business company, OKI Digital Imaging, today announced their participation in the 4th International Nanotechnology Conference on Communication and Cooperation, to be held 14th-17th April in Tokyo, Japan.
Military

Science has seen the future. And it is invisible
thestar.com April 14, 2008 "They were able to achieve invisibility to red and green light. Single colours of light can be bent in a way consistent with invisibility on a microscopic scale using nanotechnology," Kaku says. This has huge potential on the battlefield. Imagine a tank being invisible to enemy forces. No wonder the Pentagon is bankrolling research in this field. "The next step is to do a large object at one light colour," Kaku says. "Within 10 years, we may be able to make an object completely invisible to one colour of light." And that is only one of the seemingly outrageous accomplishments in the works that Kaku discusses in his new book, Physics of the Impossible.
Possible Futures

Science has seen the future. And it is invisible
thestar.com April 14, 2008 "They were able to achieve invisibility to red and green light. Single colours of light can be bent in a way consistent with invisibility on a microscopic scale using nanotechnology," Kaku says. This has huge potential on the battlefield. Imagine a tank being invisible to enemy forces. No wonder the Pentagon is bankrolling research in this field. "The next step is to do a large object at one light colour," Kaku says. "Within 10 years, we may be able to make an object completely invisible to one colour of light." And that is only one of the seemingly outrageous accomplishments in the works that Kaku discusses in his new book, Physics of the Impossible.
Water

Five firms battling it out for Genesis award
sbpost.ie April 13, 2008 Glantreo is focused on the emerging area of nanotechnology and already holds a number of patents in the area of nano-particle synthesis. It believes its technology will have particular application in the water filtration and chemical separations market. For the first time this year, a special award will be presented to an alumnus of the programme, Kieran Moynihan, one of the founders of Comnitel Technologies. After completing the Genesis programme, the Cork company went on to merge with two US firms to become Vallent, which employed 120 people in Ireland. The company was sold to IBM last year in a deal believed to be worth $200 million.

No comments: