Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 16, 2008

There have been 12 news stories since your last update.

Academic/Education

Cambridge, IIT-Powai draw up exchange programme for nano-tech research
expressindia.com April 15, 2008 Two of the most prestigious educational institutes in the world — the 800-year-old University of Cambridge and the Indian Institute of Technology -Powai that is in its golden jubilee year — signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on Wednesday to facilitate future research collaborations and exchange of students and staff in the fields of nanoscience and technology. The programme aims to send 30 IIT - Powai students to Cambridge over a period of five years. This October, two students from the IIT will be chosen to pursue a one-year MPhil course at Cambridge through the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. The programme will also include three-year PhDcourses. The funding for this agreement is about 8,00,000 pounds for a period of five years.
Announcements

Nanotech to slash gadget power consumption
techradar.com April 16, 2008 If you're fed up with high electricity bills or just worried about your carbon footprint, then how about a technology that raises the possibility of computers and other electronic devices doing their thing on as little as 0.001 per cent of current power consumption levels? Researchers at Japan's NTT have used nanotechnology to create a semiconductor that can perform computations on just a tiny fraction of the power even the best current devices use.
EPA Discusses Nanotech Regulation on Bourne Report Radio Show
The Bourne Report April 15, 2008 Jim Willis, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemical Control Division, was a featured guest this week on the Bourne Report, a talk radio program that discusses the latest developments in nanotechnology. Mr. Willis spoke at length about the regulation of nanomaterials under the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA), and provided details about the EPA's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program.
Abraxis BioScience Presents New Preclinical Data Demonstrating Eradication of Large Orthotopic Breast Tumors and Metastasis with Combined nab-Paclita
Abraxis BioScience, Inc. April 15, 2008 Findings Suggest ABRAXANE Avastin Combination Overcomes Newly Discovered Phenomenon of Reactionary Angiogenesis Results Presented at the 2008 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Indian spin-outs set to flourish
rsc.org April 15, 2008 The new law is also underpinned by year on year increases to the science budget and recent efforts to improve patent protection for new drugs. At 0.8 per cent of GDP, Indian science spending still lags behind China and most OECD countries. But this year's budget of 242 billion rupees (£3 billion) is a fifth higher than the 2007 budget, which was also a fifth higher than science spending in the previous year. Even small colleges can now expect to receive up to two million rupees to improve infrastructure such as labs and teaching facilities. 'Today an assistant professor can ask for 10 million rupees for research and committees are willing to consider the request,' says Thalappil Pradeep a chemistry professor at IIT Madras who has just launched a firm that will use proprietary nanotechnology to purify water. 'Money is not a deterrent anymore.'
Cambridge, IIT-Powai draw up exchange programme for nano-tech research
expressindia.com April 15, 2008 Two of the most prestigious educational institutes in the world — the 800-year-old University of Cambridge and the Indian Institute of Technology -Powai that is in its golden jubilee year — signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on Wednesday to facilitate future research collaborations and exchange of students and staff in the fields of nanoscience and technology. The programme aims to send 30 IIT - Powai students to Cambridge over a period of five years. This October, two students from the IIT will be chosen to pursue a one-year MPhil course at Cambridge through the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. The programme will also include three-year PhDcourses. The funding for this agreement is about 8,00,000 pounds for a period of five years.
Innovative Nanotechnologies Available for Commercialization Showcased by the National Institute of Standards and Technology
NIST April 15, 2008 More than 200 entrepreneurs and business executives learned today how they can capitalize on cutting-edge nanotechnologies developed in the research facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The event, "Opening the Doors to the National Institute of Standards and Technology: Nanoelectronics, Nanofabrication and Nanometrology," which was supported by the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Tech Council of Maryland/MdBio (TCM/MdBio), highlighted more than 21 technologies available for licensing and/or commercialization.
Carbon Nanotube Measurements: Latest in NIST ‘How-To’ Series
NIST April 15, 2008 The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), has published detailed guidelines* for making essential measurements on samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The new guide constitutes the current "best practices" for characterizing one of the most promising and heavily studied of the new generation of nanoscale materials.
'Nanodrop' Test Tubes Created with a Flip of a Switch
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a new device that creates nanodroplet "test tubes" for studying individual proteins under conditions that mimic the crowded confines of a living cell. "By confining individual proteins in nanodroplets of water, researchers can directly observe the dynamics and structural changes of these biomolecules," says physicist Lori Goldner, a coauthor of the paper* published in Langmuir.
NIST Micro Sensor and Micro Fridge Make Cool Pair
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have combined two tiny but powerful NIST inventions on a single microchip, a cryogenic sensor and a microrefrigerator. The combination offers the possibility of cheaper, simpler and faster precision analysis of materials such as semiconductors and stardust.
New method of measuring insulin promises improvements in diabetes treatment
Vanderbilt University April 15, 2008 A new method that uses nanotechnology to rapidly measure minute amounts of insulin is a major step toward developing the ability to assess the health of the body's insulin-producing cells in real time.
Chip Technology

Nanotech to slash gadget power consumption
techradar.com April 16, 2008 If you're fed up with high electricity bills or just worried about your carbon footprint, then how about a technology that raises the possibility of computers and other electronic devices doing their thing on as little as 0.001 per cent of current power consumption levels? Researchers at Japan's NTT have used nanotechnology to create a semiconductor that can perform computations on just a tiny fraction of the power even the best current devices use.
NIST Micro Sensor and Micro Fridge Make Cool Pair
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have combined two tiny but powerful NIST inventions on a single microchip, a cryogenic sensor and a microrefrigerator. The combination offers the possibility of cheaper, simpler and faster precision analysis of materials such as semiconductors and stardust.
Discoveries

Nanotech to slash gadget power consumption
techradar.com April 16, 2008 If you're fed up with high electricity bills or just worried about your carbon footprint, then how about a technology that raises the possibility of computers and other electronic devices doing their thing on as little as 0.001 per cent of current power consumption levels? Researchers at Japan's NTT have used nanotechnology to create a semiconductor that can perform computations on just a tiny fraction of the power even the best current devices use.
'Nanodrop' Test Tubes Created with a Flip of a Switch
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a new device that creates nanodroplet "test tubes" for studying individual proteins under conditions that mimic the crowded confines of a living cell. "By confining individual proteins in nanodroplets of water, researchers can directly observe the dynamics and structural changes of these biomolecules," says physicist Lori Goldner, a coauthor of the paper* published in Langmuir.
NIST Micro Sensor and Micro Fridge Make Cool Pair
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have combined two tiny but powerful NIST inventions on a single microchip, a cryogenic sensor and a microrefrigerator. The combination offers the possibility of cheaper, simpler and faster precision analysis of materials such as semiconductors and stardust.
New method of measuring insulin promises improvements in diabetes treatment
Vanderbilt University April 15, 2008 A new method that uses nanotechnology to rapidly measure minute amounts of insulin is a major step toward developing the ability to assess the health of the body's insulin-producing cells in real time.
Energy

Nanotech to slash gadget power consumption
techradar.com April 16, 2008 If you're fed up with high electricity bills or just worried about your carbon footprint, then how about a technology that raises the possibility of computers and other electronic devices doing their thing on as little as 0.001 per cent of current power consumption levels? Researchers at Japan's NTT have used nanotechnology to create a semiconductor that can perform computations on just a tiny fraction of the power even the best current devices use.
Environment

EPA Discusses Nanotech Regulation on Bourne Report Radio Show
The Bourne Report April 15, 2008 Jim Willis, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemical Control Division, was a featured guest this week on the Bourne Report, a talk radio program that discusses the latest developments in nanotechnology. Mr. Willis spoke at length about the regulation of nanomaterials under the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA), and provided details about the EPA's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program.
Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

EPA Discusses Nanotech Regulation on Bourne Report Radio Show
The Bourne Report April 15, 2008 Jim Willis, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemical Control Division, was a featured guest this week on the Bourne Report, a talk radio program that discusses the latest developments in nanotechnology. Mr. Willis spoke at length about the regulation of nanomaterials under the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA), and provided details about the EPA's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program.
Carbon Nanotube Measurements: Latest in NIST ‘How-To’ Series
NIST April 15, 2008 The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), has published detailed guidelines* for making essential measurements on samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The new guide constitutes the current "best practices" for characterizing one of the most promising and heavily studied of the new generation of nanoscale materials.
Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts

If walls could speak, they'd say 'innovation'
reportonbusiness.com April 15, 2008 Concrete is created by mixing cement, water, gravel and sand; typically these ingredients are mixed in a truck at a cement plant. When it arrives at the construction site, ideally the concrete should be like a thick liquid that can be easily shaped into moulds. But sometimes - for instance, the cement truck gets caught in a traffic jam - the concrete is already beginning to set when it arrives at the site, making it difficult to manipulate. That's where nanotechnology comes in. By controlling the hydration process - the curing of cement into concrete - at the atomic or molecular level, a researcher at the National Research Council's Institute for Research in Construction has found a way to create a more workable concrete. And it has been shown to be a stronger concrete that is less susceptible to cracking. A controlled-release "superplasticizer" in the cement can work to speed up or slow down hydration. The effect of the superplasticizer is manipulated by adjusting the cement's PH level, as well as other variables, as it cures. "You can [more] accurately time the hydration process so the concrete will be used at the right time," says Ottawa-based researcher Laila Raki, who is working with a construction chemical company to try to mass market the formula. "In the end, the industry will be able to use a concrete with a longer life span."
The advantage of uncertainty
realbusiness.co.uk April 15, 2008 Kevin Matthews, CEO of Oxonica, has also positioned his nanotechnology firm to survive any peaks and troughs in the economic climate. "Niche businesses are less susceptible to macro market conditions," he points out. "It's the big competitors with a large market share to manage that will suffer most."
EPA Discusses Nanotech Regulation on Bourne Report Radio Show
The Bourne Report April 15, 2008 Jim Willis, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemical Control Division, was a featured guest this week on the Bourne Report, a talk radio program that discusses the latest developments in nanotechnology. Mr. Willis spoke at length about the regulation of nanomaterials under the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA), and provided details about the EPA's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program.
Innovative Nanotechnologies Available for Commercialization Showcased by the National Institute of Standards and Technology
NIST April 15, 2008 More than 200 entrepreneurs and business executives learned today how they can capitalize on cutting-edge nanotechnologies developed in the research facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The event, "Opening the Doors to the National Institute of Standards and Technology: Nanoelectronics, Nanofabrication and Nanometrology," which was supported by the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Tech Council of Maryland/MdBio (TCM/MdBio), highlighted more than 21 technologies available for licensing and/or commercialization.
Materials

If walls could speak, they'd say 'innovation'
reportonbusiness.com April 15, 2008 Concrete is created by mixing cement, water, gravel and sand; typically these ingredients are mixed in a truck at a cement plant. When it arrives at the construction site, ideally the concrete should be like a thick liquid that can be easily shaped into moulds. But sometimes - for instance, the cement truck gets caught in a traffic jam - the concrete is already beginning to set when it arrives at the site, making it difficult to manipulate. That's where nanotechnology comes in. By controlling the hydration process - the curing of cement into concrete - at the atomic or molecular level, a researcher at the National Research Council's Institute for Research in Construction has found a way to create a more workable concrete. And it has been shown to be a stronger concrete that is less susceptible to cracking. A controlled-release "superplasticizer" in the cement can work to speed up or slow down hydration. The effect of the superplasticizer is manipulated by adjusting the cement's PH level, as well as other variables, as it cures. "You can [more] accurately time the hydration process so the concrete will be used at the right time," says Ottawa-based researcher Laila Raki, who is working with a construction chemical company to try to mass market the formula. "In the end, the industry will be able to use a concrete with a longer life span."
Nanomedicine

Abraxis BioScience Presents New Preclinical Data Demonstrating Eradication of Large Orthotopic Breast Tumors and Metastasis with Combined nab-Paclita
Abraxis BioScience, Inc. April 15, 2008 Findings Suggest ABRAXANE Avastin Combination Overcomes Newly Discovered Phenomenon of Reactionary Angiogenesis Results Presented at the 2008 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
New method of measuring insulin promises improvements in diabetes treatment
Vanderbilt University April 15, 2008 A new method that uses nanotechnology to rapidly measure minute amounts of insulin is a major step toward developing the ability to assess the health of the body's insulin-producing cells in real time.
Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Innovative Nanotechnologies Available for Commercialization Showcased by the National Institute of Standards and Technology
NIST April 15, 2008 More than 200 entrepreneurs and business executives learned today how they can capitalize on cutting-edge nanotechnologies developed in the research facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The event, "Opening the Doors to the National Institute of Standards and Technology: Nanoelectronics, Nanofabrication and Nanometrology," which was supported by the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Tech Council of Maryland/MdBio (TCM/MdBio), highlighted more than 21 technologies available for licensing and/or commercialization.
Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

EPA Discusses Nanotech Regulation on Bourne Report Radio Show
The Bourne Report April 15, 2008 Jim Willis, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemical Control Division, was a featured guest this week on the Bourne Report, a talk radio program that discusses the latest developments in nanotechnology. Mr. Willis spoke at length about the regulation of nanomaterials under the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA), and provided details about the EPA's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program.
Tools

Carbon Nanotube Measurements: Latest in NIST ‘How-To’ Series
NIST April 15, 2008 The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), has published detailed guidelines* for making essential measurements on samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The new guide constitutes the current "best practices" for characterizing one of the most promising and heavily studied of the new generation of nanoscale materials.
'Nanodrop' Test Tubes Created with a Flip of a Switch
NIST April 15, 2008 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a new device that creates nanodroplet "test tubes" for studying individual proteins under conditions that mimic the crowded confines of a living cell. "By confining individual proteins in nanodroplets of water, researchers can directly observe the dynamics and structural changes of these biomolecules," says physicist Lori Goldner, a coauthor of the paper* published in Langmuir.
Water

Indian spin-outs set to flourish
rsc.org April 15, 2008 The new law is also underpinned by year on year increases to the science budget and recent efforts to improve patent protection for new drugs. At 0.8 per cent of GDP, Indian science spending still lags behind China and most OECD countries. But this year's budget of 242 billion rupees (£3 billion) is a fifth higher than the 2007 budget, which was also a fifth higher than science spending in the previous year. Even small colleges can now expect to receive up to two million rupees to improve infrastructure such as labs and teaching facilities. 'Today an assistant professor can ask for 10 million rupees for research and committees are willing to consider the request,' says Thalappil Pradeep a chemistry professor at IIT Madras who has just launched a firm that will use proprietary nanotechnology to purify water. 'Money is not a deterrent anymore.'

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