Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 5, 2008

There have been 8 news stories since your last update.

Academic

Professor receives $10 million grant from Saudi university
Stanford University April 05, 2008 It's a decision any researcher would love to face: how to spend $10 million.
IGERT Profile: Tania Chan
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Tania Chan is a first year PhD student in materials science at Johns Hopkins University and member of the NanoBio IGERT with the Institute for NanoBioTechnology. IGERT stands for Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship and is funded by the National Science Foundation.
Announcements

Professor receives $10 million grant from Saudi university
Stanford University April 05, 2008 It's a decision any researcher would love to face: how to spend $10 million.
2008 NanoBio Symposium Preview: Paras Prasad
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Cancer can't hide from light of nanobiophotonics
2008 NanoBio Symposium Preview: Jennifer West
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Clinicians may soon be able to add metallic nanoshells to the arsenal of weapons that they can use to preserve and protect human health. Metallic nanoshells— super tiny spheres composed of layers of differing materials—allow light to safely penetrate deep within tissues to help diagnose or treat disease, says bioengineer Jennifer West. West will discuss her current work with nanoshells at the second annual Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium, hosted by the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, on May 1 -2 at the School of Medicine.
Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium Set for May 1-2: New workshop focuses on nanotechnology for cancer
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 All facets of research relating to the emerging discipline of nanobiotechnology—a science that operates at the scale of one-billionth of a meter—will be explored at the second annual Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium, May 1-2, 2008. This year's event will be held at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. and is hosted by the Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT).
UD nanomineral research featured in ’Science’
University of Delaware April 04, 2008 Researchers at the University of Delaware, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Ohio State University, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Minnesota and the University of South Carolina are studying how the properties of mineral nanoparticles (a nanometer is equal to one billionth of a meter) change as a function of their size.
Oxonica wins $2.15 mln additional order from existing customer
hemscott.com April 04, 2008 AIM-listed Oxonica Plc. said it has won new follow-on orders totaling US$2.15 million from one of the existing customers of its security business. The nanomaterials group said the order is for a number of development products to be delivered over the seven months through October 2008.
Energy

Oxonica wins $2.15 mln additional order from existing customer
hemscott.com April 04, 2008 AIM-listed Oxonica Plc. said it has won new follow-on orders totaling US$2.15 million from one of the existing customers of its security business. The nanomaterials group said the order is for a number of development products to be delivered over the seven months through October 2008.
Environment

UD nanomineral research featured in ’Science’
University of Delaware April 04, 2008 Researchers at the University of Delaware, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Ohio State University, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Minnesota and the University of South Carolina are studying how the properties of mineral nanoparticles (a nanometer is equal to one billionth of a meter) change as a function of their size.
Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports

The wide appliance of sensor science
biotechinfo.ie April 05, 2008 The latest research on sensors crosses the scientific divides, and offers a staggering array of practical applications. It is difficult to find a more interdisciplinary research subject than sensors. The latest generation of sensors integrates physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, information technology, nanotechnology, microfluidics and biotechnology, to name just a few. All these disciplines come together in research work conducted at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, according to the lab's senior scientist for biosensors and biomaterials, Dr Frances Ligler. These sensors combine biologically active molecules and specially designed hardware to deliver small devices that can detect anything from environmental pollution and biowarfare agents to explosives and whole bacteria, Dr Ligler explains. She delivered a keynote address on biosensors last Monday at Dublin City University, where some 300 of the world's leading optical biosensor and optical chemical sensor research scientists gathered for the ninth annual Europtrode conference.
IGERT Profile: Tania Chan
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Tania Chan is a first year PhD student in materials science at Johns Hopkins University and member of the NanoBio IGERT with the Institute for NanoBioTechnology. IGERT stands for Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship and is funded by the National Science Foundation.
Nanomedicine

2008 NanoBio Symposium Preview: Jennifer West
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Clinicians may soon be able to add metallic nanoshells to the arsenal of weapons that they can use to preserve and protect human health. Metallic nanoshells— super tiny spheres composed of layers of differing materials—allow light to safely penetrate deep within tissues to help diagnose or treat disease, says bioengineer Jennifer West. West will discuss her current work with nanoshells at the second annual Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium, hosted by the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, on May 1 -2 at the School of Medicine.
Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium Set for May 1-2: New workshop focuses on nanotechnology for cancer
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 All facets of research relating to the emerging discipline of nanobiotechnology—a science that operates at the scale of one-billionth of a meter—will be explored at the second annual Johns Hopkins NanoBio Symposium, May 1-2, 2008. This year's event will be held at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. and is hosted by the Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT).
IGERT Profile: Tania Chan
Institute for NanoBioTechnology April 04, 2008 Tania Chan is a first year PhD student in materials science at Johns Hopkins University and member of the NanoBio IGERT with the Institute for NanoBioTechnology. IGERT stands for Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship and is funded by the National Science Foundation.
Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

UD nanomineral research featured in ’Science’
University of Delaware April 04, 2008 Researchers at the University of Delaware, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Ohio State University, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Minnesota and the University of South Carolina are studying how the properties of mineral nanoparticles (a nanometer is equal to one billionth of a meter) change as a function of their size.
Sensors

The wide appliance of sensor science
biotechinfo.ie April 05, 2008 The latest research on sensors crosses the scientific divides, and offers a staggering array of practical applications. It is difficult to find a more interdisciplinary research subject than sensors. The latest generation of sensors integrates physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, information technology, nanotechnology, microfluidics and biotechnology, to name just a few. All these disciplines come together in research work conducted at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, according to the lab's senior scientist for biosensors and biomaterials, Dr Frances Ligler. These sensors combine biologically active molecules and specially designed hardware to deliver small devices that can detect anything from environmental pollution and biowarfare agents to explosives and whole bacteria, Dr Ligler explains. She delivered a keynote address on biosensors last Monday at Dublin City University, where some 300 of the world's leading optical biosensor and optical chemical sensor research scientists gathered for the ninth annual Europtrode conference.

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