Sunday, April 20, 2008

NanoNewsCustom April 6, 2008

There have been 7 news stories since your last update.

Academic

Crowd of More Than One Thousand Attends Inaugural Community Day at UAlbany NanoCollege
UAlbany CNSE April 05, 2008 Event at CNSE's Albany NanoTech is part of NEXSTEP collaboration with KeyBank
Announcements

Bonelike coating for dental implants makes everyone smile
Inderscience Publishers April 05, 2008 Research present in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Nanomanufacturing from Inderscience Publishers suggests that coating dental implants with a synthetic bone material prior to implantation allows such implant to become incorporated much more successfully into the jaw, leading to smiles all round.
Computational Quantum Chemical Methods Promising for Drug Development
Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) April 05, 2008 Many chiral molecules are important for medical treatment for illnesses ranging from acid-reflux to cancer. The research goal is to provide organic chemists with computational tools to determine the handedness of a particular molecule, which could speed up the drug development process by years.
Yang receives grant from AFOSR
thestute.com April 05, 2008 The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has given Eui-Hyeok Yang, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a grant to conduct nanoelectronics research based on carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots. Yang will serve as Principal Investigator of the project which is named "Ultra-High-Speed Single Electron Memory Devices based on Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots." Yang will also work alongside Frank Fisher, Mechanical Engineering Professor, and Stefan Strauf, Assistant Professor of Physics. Dan Choi, a professor and materials scientist at the University of Idaho, will also work with the Stevens team. Choi will mainly work on improving the CNT materials while Professor Strauf will "give his expertise on single electron transport mechanism[s]."
Crowd of More Than One Thousand Attends Inaugural Community Day at UAlbany NanoCollege
UAlbany CNSE April 05, 2008 Event at CNSE's Albany NanoTech is part of NEXSTEP collaboration with KeyBank
Pacific Researchers make breakthrough with Anti-Cancer Drug Model
University of the Pacific April 05, 2008 Researchers at University of the Pacific have designed a model for an anti-cancer drug that could lead to safer, more effective cancer treatment and drug development. The proposed drug is derived from enediynes - natural substances produced by microorganisms found in soils in Texas and Argentina during the 80's. With slight but crucial modifications, the enediynes can be "trained" to attack only cancerous tumors, leaving the surrounding healthy tissue alone and greatly increasing the survival rate of cancer treatment.
Chemistry Council, EPA Focus on Nanoscale Materials Guidance
ohsonline.com April 05, 2008 The American Chemistry Council led a panel discussion April 3 on the Environmental Protection Agency's voluntary reporting program for chemical nanoscale materials. The nanotechnology program event, which according to ACC featured the most influential players in the nanoscale materials industry, included presentations by EPA and industry representatives on the Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program's scope, aim, and logistics. Launched in January, the NMSP is a voluntary program intended to help provide a firmer scientific foundation for regulatory decisions by encouraging submissions of hazard and other information, including risk management practices, for nanoscale materials. ACC's Nanotechnology Panel, along with other stakeholders, collaborated with EPA for more than two years in the development of the NMSP to help ensure the program's success and to encourage the timely submission of the information the EPA needs.
Discoveries

Computational Quantum Chemical Methods Promising for Drug Development
Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) April 05, 2008 Many chiral molecules are important for medical treatment for illnesses ranging from acid-reflux to cancer. The research goal is to provide organic chemists with computational tools to determine the handedness of a particular molecule, which could speed up the drug development process by years.
Pacific Researchers make breakthrough with Anti-Cancer Drug Model
University of the Pacific April 05, 2008 Researchers at University of the Pacific have designed a model for an anti-cancer drug that could lead to safer, more effective cancer treatment and drug development. The proposed drug is derived from enediynes - natural substances produced by microorganisms found in soils in Texas and Argentina during the 80's. With slight but crucial modifications, the enediynes can be "trained" to attack only cancerous tumors, leaving the surrounding healthy tissue alone and greatly increasing the survival rate of cancer treatment.
Environment

Chemistry Council, EPA Focus on Nanoscale Materials Guidance
ohsonline.com April 05, 2008 The American Chemistry Council led a panel discussion April 3 on the Environmental Protection Agency's voluntary reporting program for chemical nanoscale materials. The nanotechnology program event, which according to ACC featured the most influential players in the nanoscale materials industry, included presentations by EPA and industry representatives on the Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program's scope, aim, and logistics. Launched in January, the NMSP is a voluntary program intended to help provide a firmer scientific foundation for regulatory decisions by encouraging submissions of hazard and other information, including risk management practices, for nanoscale materials. ACC's Nanotechnology Panel, along with other stakeholders, collaborated with EPA for more than two years in the development of the NMSP to help ensure the program's success and to encourage the timely submission of the information the EPA needs.
Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Yang receives grant from AFOSR
thestute.com April 05, 2008 The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has given Eui-Hyeok Yang, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a grant to conduct nanoelectronics research based on carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots. Yang will serve as Principal Investigator of the project which is named "Ultra-High-Speed Single Electron Memory Devices based on Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots." Yang will also work alongside Frank Fisher, Mechanical Engineering Professor, and Stefan Strauf, Assistant Professor of Physics. Dan Choi, a professor and materials scientist at the University of Idaho, will also work with the Stevens team. Choi will mainly work on improving the CNT materials while Professor Strauf will "give his expertise on single electron transport mechanism[s]."
Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports

Human growth hormone: the wonder stuff
timesonline.co.uk April 05, 2008 John Kressaty, the chemist and creative brain behind "h" Serum, maintains that 3Lab has invested £2.5m to produce the nanotechnology necessary to allow HGH to penetrate the skin. "These hormones travel through the dermis via the hair follicles. About 80% of the growth-hormone receptors in the skin are clustered at the base of the hair follicles," he says. "We view it as hormone-replacement therapy for the skin. Our clinical trials were done on sun-damaged, prematurely aged skin in Australia, and we found a 100% improvement in wrinkles and skin texture." Although 3Lab hasn't yet advertised in the UK, the £100 face serum and a second product, WW Eye Cream at £125 a pot, both have a word-of-mouth following and regularly sell out. "My skin has never looked so dewy," says one user of the serum. "It just feels thicker in a way. I noticed results within two days."
Military

Yang receives grant from AFOSR
thestute.com April 05, 2008 The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has given Eui-Hyeok Yang, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a grant to conduct nanoelectronics research based on carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots. Yang will serve as Principal Investigator of the project which is named "Ultra-High-Speed Single Electron Memory Devices based on Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots." Yang will also work alongside Frank Fisher, Mechanical Engineering Professor, and Stefan Strauf, Assistant Professor of Physics. Dan Choi, a professor and materials scientist at the University of Idaho, will also work with the Stevens team. Choi will mainly work on improving the CNT materials while Professor Strauf will "give his expertise on single electron transport mechanism[s]."
Nanoelectronics

Yang receives grant from AFOSR
thestute.com April 05, 2008 The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has given Eui-Hyeok Yang, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a grant to conduct nanoelectronics research based on carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots. Yang will serve as Principal Investigator of the project which is named "Ultra-High-Speed Single Electron Memory Devices based on Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots." Yang will also work alongside Frank Fisher, Mechanical Engineering Professor, and Stefan Strauf, Assistant Professor of Physics. Dan Choi, a professor and materials scientist at the University of Idaho, will also work with the Stevens team. Choi will mainly work on improving the CNT materials while Professor Strauf will "give his expertise on single electron transport mechanism[s]."
Nanomedicine

Computational Quantum Chemical Methods Promising for Drug Development
Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) April 05, 2008 Many chiral molecules are important for medical treatment for illnesses ranging from acid-reflux to cancer. The research goal is to provide organic chemists with computational tools to determine the handedness of a particular molecule, which could speed up the drug development process by years.
Pacific Researchers make breakthrough with Anti-Cancer Drug Model
University of the Pacific April 05, 2008 Researchers at University of the Pacific have designed a model for an anti-cancer drug that could lead to safer, more effective cancer treatment and drug development. The proposed drug is derived from enediynes - natural substances produced by microorganisms found in soils in Texas and Argentina during the 80's. With slight but crucial modifications, the enediynes can be "trained" to attack only cancerous tumors, leaving the surrounding healthy tissue alone and greatly increasing the survival rate of cancer treatment.
Personal Care

Human growth hormone: the wonder stuff
timesonline.co.uk April 05, 2008 John Kressaty, the chemist and creative brain behind "h" Serum, maintains that 3Lab has invested £2.5m to produce the nanotechnology necessary to allow HGH to penetrate the skin. "These hormones travel through the dermis via the hair follicles. About 80% of the growth-hormone receptors in the skin are clustered at the base of the hair follicles," he says. "We view it as hormone-replacement therapy for the skin. Our clinical trials were done on sun-damaged, prematurely aged skin in Australia, and we found a 100% improvement in wrinkles and skin texture." Although 3Lab hasn't yet advertised in the UK, the £100 face serum and a second product, WW Eye Cream at £125 a pot, both have a word-of-mouth following and regularly sell out. "My skin has never looked so dewy," says one user of the serum. "It just feels thicker in a way. I noticed results within two days."
Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Chemistry Council, EPA Focus on Nanoscale Materials Guidance
ohsonline.com April 05, 2008 The American Chemistry Council led a panel discussion April 3 on the Environmental Protection Agency's voluntary reporting program for chemical nanoscale materials. The nanotechnology program event, which according to ACC featured the most influential players in the nanoscale materials industry, included presentations by EPA and industry representatives on the Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program's scope, aim, and logistics. Launched in January, the NMSP is a voluntary program intended to help provide a firmer scientific foundation for regulatory decisions by encouraging submissions of hazard and other information, including risk management practices, for nanoscale materials. ACC's Nanotechnology Panel, along with other stakeholders, collaborated with EPA for more than two years in the development of the NMSP to help ensure the program's success and to encourage the timely submission of the information the EPA needs.

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